Energy Weapons

Energy Weapons

Paul Schaefer Ground Zero Club | 4311 Holmes |Kansas City, MO 64110 Reprinted from: Exotic Research Report (Volume 1, Issue 1; Jan/Feb/Mar 1996) The Silent Battlezone Of itself, the sophisticated electronic environment created during military deployment is such a source of stress that it is not surprising to hear that servicemen are committing suicide, as occurred during the Haiti invasion. This electromagnetic infrastructure of the modern battlefield has given birth to a new generation of weapons which, when compared to nuclear explosions, seem nonlethal in nature. In 1986, Congressman Newt Gingrich, in a foreword for Low Intensity Conflict and Modern Technology, wrote that the United States had a long history of coping rather successfully with low intensity threats such as the Native Americans. The present Speaker of the House of Representatives pointed out that the U.S. systematically subdued low-intensity threats to America’s politics almost without debate or news coverage. In this Air Force document Capt. Paul E. Tyler, MC, USN, described the potential for use of the electromagnetic spectrum in low- intensity conflict. In keeping with the concept of avoiding news coverage, it appears that electromagnetic warfare would be disguised with more noticeable events like the two stealth planes that flew all the way to Panama during that invasion to each drop a single bomb in an open field. The concept of simply zapping a target with energy has become more refined and directed, such as pulsing a carrier wave like sound with disruptive brain waves. This means that the high intensity sound broadcast at the Papal Nunico to aid in capturing General Noriega during the Panama invasion and...